How an African slave helped Boston fight smallpox - The Boston Globe

medievalpoc:

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked. The story of how Boston began to overcome smallpox illustrates the strife that epidemics can cause, but also the encouraging notion that humans can communicate remedies as quickly as they communicate germs—and that the solutions we most need often come from the places we least expect to find them.

Mather had come close to choosing a career in medicine, and devoured the scientific publications of the Royal Society in London. As the society began to turn its attention to inoculation practices around the world, Mather realized that he had an extraordinary expert living in his household. Onesimus was a “pretty Intelligent Fellow,” it had become clear to him. When asked if he’d ever had smallpox, Onesimus answered “Yes and No,” explaining that he had been inoculated with a small amount of smallpox, which had left him immune to the disease. Fascinated, Mather asked for details, which Onesimus provided, and showed him his scar. We can almost hear Onesimus speaking in Mather’s accounts, for Mather took the unusual step of writing out his words with the African accent included—the key phrase was, “People take Juice of Small-Pox; and Cutty-skin, and Putt in a Drop.”

Excited, he investigated among other Africans in Boston and realized that it was a widespread practice; indeed, a slave could be expected to fetch a higher price with a scar on his arm, indicating that he was immune. Mather sent the Royal Society his own reports from the wilds of America, eager to prove the relevance of Boston (and by extension, Cotton Mather) to the global crusade against infectious disease. His interviews with Onesimus were crucial. In 1716, writing to an English friend, he promised that he would be ready to promote inoculation if smallpox ever visited the city again.

American History, but something I think a lot of people would be interested to read.

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When someone asks if I like books

dukeofbookingham:

title2come:

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Solid

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the-snazzy-jazzy-pirate-ship:

Whenever you’re feeling down, just remember that Mulan was a real person.

Hua Mulan went to war at 15 years old and eventually led the army for almost a decade, leading countless attacks and winning victories for China. Decorated with honors, she returned home to her happy, living parents. When her army friends visited her, they found out that she was a woman and accepted it. 

Next excuse for limiting women’s rights, please.

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..rape is not aggressive sexuality, it is sexualized aggression. Audre Lorde; Age, Race, Class and Sex: Women Redefining Difference (via iggyazazel)

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mychemicalbooks:

The best part of writing is when you can’t stop the words pouring out; you are in such a rush to see them inked they tumble seamlessly out of your heart, your mind, and just you. You loose yourself in their constant flow, and that trance you’re in is truly the most wonderful thing about writing. 

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Writing fiction feels like an adventurous act, nudging aside reality a word at a time. James Van Pelt (via maxkirin)

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